3 Ways the Public Library Helps Entrepreneurs

By: The Seattle Public Library

Whether you are exploring a new business idea or are trying to grow an existing small business, your public library can be an important ally in helping you create a viable plan. The Seattle Public Library (SPL), King County Library System (KCLS), and Pierce County Library System (PCLS) offer access to an extensive selection of free resources for entrepreneurs at any stage.

Here are three great ways you can take advantage of your public library:

1: Conduct Market and Industry Research

Business databases accessible through your library’s website can help you locate valuable research and data that is not available on the open web. With your library card, you can access these tools 24/7 without having to visit the library. You’ll find:

Information about other companies:
Enhanced business directories will help you identify competitors, prospects, suppliers or partners, and they are searchable by type of business and geography. These directories also include detailed information for private companies that can be difficult to find elsewhere, like estimates on revenue and number of employees. Look for: ReferenceUSA (SPL, KCLS) and Mergent Intellect (PCLS, KCLS)

Information about consumers:
Demographics databases are useful for choosing a business location, locating target customers, and sizing your market. These tools go beyond basic census data and dive deeper into consumer spending and psychographics. Look for: DemographicsNow (SPL, PCLS) and Social Explorer (KCLS)

Information about your industry:
Industry reports available through business databases will include your industry’s trends, opportunities, challenges, regional highlights, financial benchmarks, and more. Look for: ABI/Inform Trade and Industry (SPL, KCLS) and Business Source Complete (PCLS)

2: Build Your Technology and Business Skills

Web classes:
Brush up on business and tech skills with online courses you can take at home, at any time, and on your own schedule. Classes range from beginner to advanced level, and include a wide range of courses like social media marketing and Microsoft Access. Look for: lynda.com (SPL, PCLS, KCLS), Microsoft Imagine Academy (all libraries)

Books & eBooks:
Library collections include up-to-date guides on starting a business, writing a business plan, marketing, business tech skills, and more – available in print or as eBooks. Look for: Safari Tech Books (SPL) for its vast collection of up-to-date tech and business eBooks that are always available.

Library events:
Attend free library workshops and events to get expert advice and ask your own questions on topics like marketing, operations, funding, opening a food business, and more. Meet representatives of local agencies at library-hosted open houses. Check your library’s calendar to find out what’s happening soon!

3: Get Research Help

Locating the best business resources for your needs and then learning how to use them can be time consuming and frustrating. Librarians are available to make this process a little less painful! All libraries can help in person, over the phone, and by email; Seattle Public Library also offers one-on-one business research appointments.

5 Tips to Ensure Your Business Gets Paid

By: The Export-Import Bank of the United States

According to a U.S. Bank study, “roughly 82 percent of small businesses actually fail due to inefficient management of cash flow.”  One of the catalysts for inefficient cash flow is outstanding invoices, which continues to be a major pain point for small businesses that try to remain financially healthy. Costs associated with late payments—such as interest costs or legal fees—must be avoided, and when domestic business turns into foreign business, collecting payment can be much harder, so we’ve identified some tips below to ensure your business gets paid going forward.

1. Develop a Systematic Payment process

It’s critical to set up an easy-to-use payment process system to allow your customers to receive automatic notifications, emails and alerts. For example, if a due date is coming soon, an email can be sent out automatically to the buyer or an alert can be sent to the exporter notifying them to call the buyer. Calling has served as a great customer service technique because it allows the exporter to establish a more personal relationship with the buyer.

2. Incentivize customers

As you start to build a relationship with your foreign buyer, it may be wise to incentivize a customer to pay earlier than the due date by providing a small discount on the total invoice price.

 3. Communicate with your company

An exporter’s credit management process needs to be understood by everyone in the organization because there may be times when other internal departments play a part in collecting the payment. For example, an exporter’s sales group may communicate with the client more than the finance department, so being able to communicate, educate and enforce the payment process from all departments may help the exporter collect final payment.

 4. Document, document, document!

Make sure there is an efficient document management system when collecting invoices (especially the signed invoices) and other payment conditions/notices. Each invoice must clearly state terms and conditions, but before sending out an invoice, have a lawyer review the initial invoice template with stated terms and conditions (and if modifications need to be made, have it reviewed every time for consistency).

5. Research, research, research!

Finding out information about a foreign buyer may be difficult, therefore, leveraging your relationship with the U.S. Department of Commerce local offices or your local trade association may help when doing your research on whether or not the potential foreing buyer is in financial good standing. Local credit bureaus or local Chambers of Commerce groups may also be avialable to provide information on foreign buyers and they also may have industry background data on payment tendencies (such as average days sales outstanding). Finally, visiting the foreign buyer in their home country may give an exporter a better idea of whom they are doing business with and helps to establish better relations.

EXIM Bank offers export credit insurance, which helps the exporter mitigate the risk of foreign buyers not able to pay. With export credit insurance, EXIM Bank will cover up to 95 percent of the invoice and, in addition, will vet potential buyers to ensure they are in good financial standing. For more information on export credit insurance, click on this link to set up a free consultation with an EXIM Bank specialist in your local area!